IAS Grant Recipients

Since its inception in spring 1996, the IAS has worked hard to support radical, anti-authoritarian scholarship on contemporary social contradictions and the possibilities of meaningful social transformation. Although the libertarian Left has become an increasingly important presence on the streets, radical theoretical work is just as important now as it was over a decade ago. There is a great need to clarify the anarchist alternative, deepen critiques of the present society, and study the victories and dilemmas of nonhierarchical movements if anarchists and like-minded others are to build on their accomplishments. The IAS is a means toward this goal.

Over these past thirteen years, the IAS has given grants to over seventy projects by writers and translators from around the world, including from Argentina, Canada, New Zealand, Lebanon, Chile, Ireland, Nigeria, Mexico, the Philippines, Germany, Uruguay, South Africa, the Czech Republic, and the United States. The IAS has funded movement research, translations, historical studies, essays and books, and even a play. Many of these projects would not have been completed without IAS support and encouragement.

What follows is a complete list of projects that the IAS has supported from 1996 to 2009.

Winter 2012
Michael Byrne
Struggles against debt and speculation in Ireland and the Spanish state

Winter 2012
Pratyush Chandra
Neoliberal Industrialization in India and Workers Militancy beyond Institutions

Winter 2012
Claudia Villegas Delgado
“That’s how the light gets in’’: The story of a conspicuous dialogue to crack capitalism in the 21st century

Winter 2012
China Martens
Radical Childcare: The Kidz City Model

Winter 2012
Will Munger
Domestic Counterinsurgency in Salinas, CA

Winter 2012
Theresa Warburton
Anarchisms and US/Third World Feminisms

Fall 2011
CSE
At High Tide…the Ship Will Rise: Communiques, writings, and reflections regarding the arrests of Diego Petrissans and Leandro Morel - translation into English

Fall 2011
Jared Davidson
The Freedom Group: Philip Josephs and anarchism in New Zealand 1900-1920

Fall 2011
Brad Thomson
Anarchist Veterans of the U.S. Military

Winter 2011
Asaf Shalev and Clayton Hartmann
The Stolen Milk Riots: History and Ramifications of the Israeli Black Panther Movement

Winter 2011
Nadia Shevchenko
Translation of two chapters of Murray Bookchin’s The Ecology of Freedom―“Introduction” and “The Concept of Social Ecology"―into Russian

Winter 2011
Eric Stanley
Outlaw Lives: Gender Self-determination, Queer Abolition, and Trans Resistance

Winter 2011
Thomas
Genoa Ten Years Later: Lessons Learned for International Legal Support

Summer 2010
Kolya Abramsky
Steps Toward Community-Worker-Led Conversion of the Energy-Intensive Industries, Collective Control of Production, Reparations, and De-Growth: Detroit and the World

Summer 2010
Emma Dixon
Women, Love, and Anarchism: British Feminism, c. 1968–1978

Summer 2010
James Generic
Across Three Decades of Anarchism, v. 2: Lessons Learned from the Wooden Shoe Collective

Summer 2010
Rosehip Medic Collective
Alternatives to Emergency Medical Services (EMS)

Winter 2010
Judith Arcana
Keesha and Joanie and Jane

Winter 2010
Eric Larson
Class, Nationalism, and the Popular Indigenous Council of Oaxaca—Ricardo Flores Magón

Winter 2010
David Meieran
In Search of King Ludd

Winter 2010
Marie Trigona
Occupy Everything! Factory Occupations and Worker Self-management in Latin America: Strategies for Social Emancipation

Winter 2010
David Zlutnick and Ian Paul
Stones and Flowers: Confronting the Crisis

Summer 2009
KellyAnne Mifflin
Sienvolando: Snapshots of Art Actions, Popular Power, and Collaborative Networks in Argentina

Summer 2009
Scott Pierpont
Organizing against Capitalism: Translation of Eric Duran’s Creating a Counterhegemonic Economic System

Summer 2009
Taylor Sparrow
Futures Not (Yet) Chosen: An Antiauthoritarian Vision for South Africa

Winter 2009
Sarah Irving
Anarchist lives in Manchester

Winter 2009
Kristian Williams
"A Prisoner With a Noble Face": Oscar Wilde and the Victorian Prison

Summer 2008
David Solnit
Battle of Seattle and Network Organizing: History and Lessons

Summer 2008
Andrea Gibbons
Driven from Below

Summer 2008
Can Baskent
Conscientious Objection as a Human Right: A Logico-Anarchist Approach

Winter 2008
Andy Cornell
The Movement for a New Society: Consensus, Prefiguration, and Direct Action in the 1970s and 1980s

Winter 2008
Daniel Cairns
Chinese Anarchist Periodicals

Winter 2008
Amy Seidenverg
Apex: Locating Cascadia Forest Defense in Feminism, Anarchism, and Queer Theory

Summer 2007
Noel Barcelona
Anarkismo: Is There a Truly Filipino Anarchist Theory and Movement?

Summer 2007
Mark Derby
A Country Considered to be Free: A Transnational History of the IWW in Aotearoa, New Zealand

Winter 2007
Colin Bossen
The Chicago Couriers Union: A Case Study in Solidarity Unionism

Winter 2007
Emily Abendroth
You Are Your Own Worst Enemy: The Use of "Self-Abuse" as a Mask to Institutional Culpability at Eastern State Penitentiary and Guantanamo Bay

Summer 2006
Hillary Lazar

Man! and the International Group: 1930s' American Anarchism and State Repression in a Climate of Fear

Winter 2006
Mandisi Majavu
Development in South Africa

Winter 2006
Jacob Mundy
Self-Governance in Exile: The Western Saharan Refugees, Thirty Years Later.

Summer 2005
Kazembe Balagun
Queering the X: James Baldwin, Malcolm X and the Third World

Summer 2005
Evan Daniel
Rolling for the Revolution: A Transnational History
of Cuban Cigarmakers in Havana, South Florida and New York City, 1868-1895

Summer 2005
Ramor Ryan
Zapatista Spring: Autonomy and a Water Project

Winter 2005
Daniel Burton-Rose
Listening to an Enforced Silence: Ba-Jin in Communist China

Winter 2005
Heather Villalobos
Black Star Rising: People of Color and Radical Resistance

Summer 2004
Melissa Forbis & Cale Layton
Anarchist Trade Unions in Bolivia: 1920-1950

Summer 2004
Trevor Paglen
Recoding Carceral Landscapes

Summer 2004
Stevphen Shukaitis
Between Sisyphus and Self-Management: The Relevance of Autonomous Organizations in a Globalized World

Winter 2004
Robert Graham
Anarchism: A Documentary History

Winter 2004
Marta Kolarova¡
Gender in the Czech Anarchist Movement

Winter 2003
Kolya Abramsky
Global Finance Capital and the
Permanent War:
The Dollar, Wall Street and the War Against Iraq

Summer 2003
Nate Holdren
19 and 20:
Notes for the New Social Protagonism

Summer 2003
Marina Sitrin
Horizontalism:
Voices of Popular Power in Argentina

Winter 2003
Errol Schweitzer
Rage at Dawn

Winter 2003
Sandra Jeppesen
Anarchy, Revolution, Freedom:
Towards Anarchist Cultural Theory

Winter 2003
Justin Jackson
Black Roses Black Masks:
The American Anarchist Movement and its Media in the Vietnam Years

Winter 2003
Josh McPhee
Building New Contexts for Anarchist
Graphics, Video and Film

Summer 2002
Leslie A. Kauffman
Direct Action:
The Search for Radical Renewal

Summer 2002
Ramor Ryan
Globalization and its Discontents

Winter 2002
Sean Gauthier
Many Manifestations:
Blueprints for a Bricoleur’s War Machine

Winter 2002
Ali Sauer
Voicing Exclusion(s):
A Critical Examination of Current Discourses on the “Anti-Corporate Globalization” Movement

Winter 2002
Lorenzo Komboa Ervin
Anarchism and the Black Revolution

Summer 2001
Carlos Fernandez & Jena Cephas
The Quilombo Project

Summer 2001
Ronald Campbell
The Anarchist Within:
Anarchist Prisoners Building a Movement

Summer 2001

Bill Weinberg

Pachamama Betrayed:
Ecological Crime and Indigenous Resistance to the Andean Drug Wars

Winter 2001
Caitlin Hewitt-White
Gender in Current Anti-Globalization
Activism in Canada

Winter 2001
Jessica Lawless
Racializing Anarchism Then and Now

Winter 2001
Andreas Perez & Felipe del Solar
Chile:
Anarchist Practices under Pinochet

Winter 2001
Will Firth
Three Russian to English Translations

Summer 2000
Kevin Doyle
Orange Fire

Summer 2000
Lucien van der Walt
Anarchism and Revolutionary Syndicalism in South Africa, 1904-1921

Winter 2000
Mike Staudenmaier
Toward a New Anarchist Theory of Nationalism

Winter 2000
Alberto Villarreal
Spanish translation of Murray Bookchin's
Remaking Society (Rehaciendo la Sociedad)

Winter 2000
Fernando Gustavo Lopez Trujillo
The FACA and the Anarchist Movement
in Argentina, 1930-1950

Summer 1999
C. W. Brown
Vanguards of the Crusaders:
Freedom and Domination in Right-wing Discourse

Winter 1999
Samuel Mbah & I.E. Igariwey
Military Dictatorship and the State
in Africa

Summer 1998
Joe Lowndes
Anarchism and the Rise of Rightwing
Anti-Statism

Summer 1998
Patricia Greene
Federica Montseny:
The Woman and the Ideal/La Mujer y El Ideal

Summer 1998
Will Firth
Three Russian and Bulgarian into English
Translations

Summer 1998
Lucien van der Walt
Anarchism and Revolutionary Syndicalism
in South Africa, 1904 - 1921

Winter 1998
Chris Day
Anarchism and the Zapatista Revolution

Winter 1998
Matt Hern & Stu Chaulk
The Myth of the Internet:
Private Isolation and Local Community

Winter 1998
Melissa Burch
Autonomy, Culture, and Natural Resources
in the Neo-liberal Age

Summer 1997
Zoe Erwin & Brian Tokar
Redesigning Life:
The Worldwide Challenge to Genetic Engineering

Summer 1997
Frank Adams
The Educational Ideas and Management
Practices of 19th and 20th Century Anarchists in Labor-Owned Cooperatives

Summer 1997
Peter Lamborn Wilson
Freedom - My Dream:
The Autobiography of Enrico Arrigoni

Summer 1997
Mark Bonhert & Richard Curtis
Passionate and Dangerous:
Conversations with Midwestern Antiauthoritarians and Anarchists

Winter 1997
Murray Bookchin
The Spanish Anarchists

Winter 1997
Alan Antliff
Anarchist Modernism:
Art, Politics, and the First American Avant-Garde

Winter 1997
Kwaku Kushindana
Avoiding New Forms of Repression:
An African-American Reply

Winter 1997
Paul Fleckenstein
Civic Space and the Anarchist Dream


Struggles Against Debt and Speculation in Ireland and the Spanish State
Michael Byrne - $500

The essay looks at government responses to the property crisis in Spain and Ireland and new movements which have emerged to challenge those responses. While the political class in Spain and Ireland squander public money in an attempt to shore up the financial and property sectors the movements examined in this essay are re-appropriating (via occupation) property from banks and state agencies in order to challenge the logic of property speculation. The essay will make two specific contributions. Firstly, I draw on contemporary radical political economy, mainly form the Italian post-autonomist tradition, to analyse the relationship between property speculation, financialization and speculative attacks on the sovereign debt of peripheral European countries such as Spain and Ireland. The objective here is to contribute a useful theoretical orientation from a social movement perspective. Secondly, by examining the case of Unlock NAMA (in Ireland) and the Plataforma de Afectados por la Hipoteca in Spain I want to point towards a common horizon of European struggle against property speculation, debt and financialization and draw out what we can learn from each of these struggles.

Michael Byrne is a researcher and activist based in Dublin. His present focus is on activist research and direct action in the context of the Irish government’s intervention in the financial and property crisis. Michael is also active in autonomous education, with a current focus on educational activities within occupy and related movements. Michael has recently been awarded a PhD from the Department of Sociology, Trinity College Dublin. His thesis was on state transformation and depoliticisation in Northern Ireland.


At High Tide…the Ship Will Rise: Communiques, writings, and reflections regarding the arrests of Diego Petrissans and Leandro Morel - translation into English
Pratyush Chandra - $500

The established legal trade unionism in India has not been able to represent the everyday struggle of the worker in the neoliberal phase of capitalism, which is increasingly raising the more fundamental issues concerning the very constitution of industrial polity and work. There is a growing gap between the rank-and-file aspirations and the logic on which existing trade unionism was built in India, which essentially served as a means to straitjacket the former into a legal discourse. This has led the working class to refine and put to use the most immediate tool of its self-activity, i.e., the autonomous and spontaneous routes of direct action. In recent past, we have seen many working class struggles in India that could not be bound in any preconceived legal organizational forms. This project attempts to understand and document some of these struggles waged in North India. It would critique how institutions that are thrown up in the process of workers' struggles become alienated and are transformed into agencies through which hegemonic structures are reproduced within. It would detail how in the everydayness of struggle, workers try to counter these structures and develop ever new expressions of counter-hegemony.

Pratyush Chandra is an activist based in Delhi (India) and is associated with Radical Notes. He recently authored a booklet, “Capitalism, Labour and Politics in Rural India” (2010) and edited a volume entitled “Neoliberalism, Primitive Accumulation and Politics in India” (2011). He is also a co-editor of “The Politics of Imperialism & Counterstrategies” (2004). He has contributed in various ezines and journals including, Socialist Register, Review of Radical Political Economics, Counterpunch, MRzine and ZNet.


“That’s how the light gets in’’: The story of a conspicuous dialogue to crack capitalism in the 21st century
Claudia Villegas Delgado - $300

This project focuses a series of social mobilizations -consisting in assemblies, marches and protests- launched particularly among Hispanic immigrants in New York City in the Fall 2011, as they are indicative of an intended coordinated response of the immigrants to the political momentum created by the occupy wall street movement. This essay will gather extensive testimonies of immigrants that promoted and/or participated in three focal mobilizations: the birth of the first ows assembly-en español, the ows-en español and ows-latinoamérica; the protest for the rights of the immigrant women, and the march for the immigrants’ political rights. The testimonies will reflect the immigrants’ response to these actions in terms of its significance, their own backgrounds of social struggle and, the ideas and practices that made these initiatives concurrent with the owsm in terms of their use of public spaces and streets to mobilize political ideas around demands of social justice. The testimonies will be eventually articulated into a reflective piece to illuminate the continuity and the imagination of political alternatives that links the present political momentum with the thrust and learning of the immigrant mobilizations started in 2006. As history as shown, it is the very geography of domination what creates the historical conditions to unify social struggle, and today, right at the core of the geography of capitalism a dialogue between the Hispanic immigrants and the occupy movement has began.

Claudia is a geographer doctoral scholar. Her research focuses on ethnic studies, social movements in Mexico and Latin America, Mexican immigration to the United States, socio-spatial inequality in contemporary cities. Currently she is an invited professor at Seton Hall University, in New Jersey, and in recent years she has been active in community-oriented media projects and grassroots organizations doing advocacy for the Latino/Mexican community, and immigrant women in New York City. She also collaborates as the photography Gallery director of Huellas Mexicanas (www.huellasmexicanas.com), an independent web-based media effort to document the social experience of the Mexicans and the Mexican Americans living in the U.S.


Radical Childcare: The Kidz City Model
China Martens - $300

Kidz City is a radical anarcha-feminist childcare collective that supports parents and children participation at social justice gatherings and events in Baltimore, Maryland. Kidz City started as youth programming and childcare at the City From Below conference in 2009. After working together at many subsequent events including: book-fairs, community dinners, and most recently the Fair Development Conference, DIY Fest, and IWW Convention, a model emerged for organizing collective support for caregivers and children. The time has come to gather the “Kidz City Model” in order to share it with others. This essay will answer activist’s questions about how Kidz City organizes, sets up childcare space, recruits volunteers, and develops programming. Additionally, it will contain struggles and lessons learned, as well as forms, checklists, and processes.

China Martens is the author of The Future Generation: The Zine-book for Subculture Parents, Kids, Friends and Others (Atomic Book Company 2007), and the co-editor of Don’t Leave Your Friends Behind: A Radical Parents’ Allies Handbook (PM Press, 2012). China’s short story, “On the Road (with baby)” was published in Breeder: Real-Life Stories from the New Generation of Mothers (Seal Press, 2001) and has had various other essays printed in publications such as Baltimore Indypendent Reader, HipMama, WIN Magazine, and Revolutionary Motherhood. Since 2003, China has facilitated workshops to create support for parents and children in activist and radical communities. She is also a co-founder of Kidz City, a radical childcare collective in Baltimore.


Domestic Counterinsurgency in Salinas, CA
Will Munger - $500

Counterinsurgency is a theory and practice of state control that has undergone significant development as a result of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.  The City of Salinas, California, the Salinas Police Departments, and the Naval Postgraduate School began collaborating in 2009 to apply counterinsurgency against street gangs. The current operation in Salinas is one clear example of how the Long War (formerly the War on Terror) is coming back to affect life in the United States.  This project will trace the shifting theoretical architecture undergirding one of the first explicit uses of domestic counterinsurgency.  Through an ethnographic approach to the operation in Salinas, it will outline how state security forces plan to reassert governance in a neighborhood where the police and city government have lost legitimacy.  Based on a critical analysis of recently declassified military research, it appears that the Salinas counterinsurgency program intends to reassert social and political control through techniques that build human and technological networks into the Latino population of East Salinas.  These police networks are designed to generate a statist sensibility in the population as well as generate information flows about targetable social networks that enable gang formation. 

Will Munger is an editor and contributor to the upcoming book Life During Wartime (AK Press 2013).  


Anarchisms and US/Third World Feminisms
Theresa Warburton - $300

This essay is both an exercise in and exploration of alternative models of building solidarity in radical social and political movements. Despite many similarities between the methods, theories, and praxes of anarchisms of the past 20 years and US/Third World Feminisms, there has been little inquiry into the relationship between the two. In highlighting some prevalent affinities between these two bodies of thought and praxis, this essay will demonstrate the urgent necessity of considering how to build radical social and political movements that consider difference between peoples and communities to be essential rather than divisive; an alternative model for building solidarity through 'alliances of transformation’ as opposed to 'alliances of exchange'.

Theresa Warburton is a PhD Candidate in the Global Gender Studies Department where currently teaches. She is especially interested in contemporary anarchist theory, women of color feminisms, and speculative fiction as radical praxis. She is committed to community organizing and works mostly in the interests of prison abolition, student movements, reproductive justice, and urban farming. Her life is made up of the people she loves, the food she feeds them, the books she read and discusses with them, and the music she listens to and plays with them. She believes strongly in the radical potential of the imagination and is constantly trying to engage her own and others' imaginations through all of the things she mentioned above.


At High Tide…the Ship Will Rise: Communiques, writings, and reflections regarding the arrests of Diego Petrissans and Leandro Morel - translation into English
CSE - $750

On the 18th of December, 2005, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the property of Marcelo Tinelli (television magnate and producer of Ideas del Sur) was robbed. Ideas del Sur and Marcelo Tinelli are heavily involved with the funding and creation of the Trafipan 2000 tourism project, where Mapuche land in Southern Argentina is being bought up and developed into tourist resorts, while the original inhabitants are being evicted and forced into urban areas.  In 2006, following the accusations of a snitch, the cops raided the anarchist social space Angela Fortunato, and various houses associated with the social space. As a result of these raids, 2 companerxs (Leandro Morel and Diego Petrissans) were arrested, and there was warrant put out for a third companerx, who has, to date, not been found! Largely due to the (then) newly-instated Blumberg law, Diego and Leandro were sentenced to 10 and 11 years respectively, and are currently serving time. Since being locked up, Diego has participated in solidarity actions with Nadine Tribian and Gabriel Pombo da Silva, as well as recently being involved in a hunger strike in the Devoto prison.   This project is a translation of ‘Cuando Sube la marea…el barco se sube’, a zine put out by the anti-prison group based out of Montevideo, Uruguay (Coordinacion Anticarcelaria del rio de la plata), from castellano to English, with the addition of several more recent communiqués from Diego and Leandro, including information about the Devoto strike. 

CSE has spent some time in a few different places, but sometimes calls southern ontario (specifically occupied neutral territory) their home. They’re pretty excited to have conversations and build relationships with folks who are critical of prisons and the society that needs them. They also really like hanging out with deer and slugs.


The Freedom Group: Philip Josephs and anarchism in New Zealand 1900-1920
Jared Davidson - $750

Jared Davidson will explore early anarchism in New Zealand (c.1900 -1920) through a biography of Philip Josephs—Jewish anarchist, radical bookseller, and founder of New Zealand's first anarchist collective, Freedom Group. He hopes to provide insights into this understudied radical tradition of New Zealand labour, placing it in both a national and transnational context.

Jared Davidson (Christchurch, New Zealand) is the author of 'This is Not a Manifesto: Towards an anarcho-design practice' and other writings on design and anarchism. A poster-maker turned labour historian, 'Remains to be Seen: Tracing Joe Hill's ashes in New Zealand' was his first attempt at historical research. Jared is a member of the Labour History Project, anarchist collective Beyond Resistance, and Katipo Books Workers' Co-Operative.


Anarchist Veterans of the U.S. Military
Brad Thomson - $1000

This project will be an examination of the experiences and perspectives of veterans of the U.S. military who have developed an anarchist analysis.  It will be based on extensive interviews with anti-authoritarian activists about their experiences in the military, what radicalized them, how they were introduced to anarchist thought and their analysis of militarism.  The goals of the piece will be to develop an analysis of authoritarianism informed by the social domination that perpetuates militarism and to explore the ways in which anarchists can support resistance by GIs as an effective strategy against U.S. wars and occupations.

‪Brad Thomson is an anarchist organizer and legal worker living in Chicago.  He has been active in a number of anti-war groups and other radical projects, including Food Not Bombs, Finding Our Roots and Civilian-Soldier Alliance, a group working to support anti-war service members and veterans.   He also works as a paralegal and investigator at People’s Law Office, handling civil rights lawsuits against police and government agencies and representing activists criminalized for their political activity.   ‬


The Stolen Milk Riots: History and Ramifications of the Israeli Black Panther Movement
Asaf Shalev and Clayton Hartmann - $250

The brief existence of the Israeli Black Panther (IBP) movement has gone relatively unnoticed in both traditional academic publishing as well as radical academic circles. Through their IAS grant-funded research, Asaf and Clayton plan to briefly trace the early beginnings of the IBP movement along with the conditions of the Mizrahi (the term Mizrahi applies to all Jews of Middle Eastern ancestry and ethnicity) ghettos that inspired it. From there they will follow the IBP’s collapse due to the spread of nationalism by the 1973 war and Cointelpro-style repression by the administration of former Prime Minister Golda Meir. They will then finish with a brief examination of how little has actually changed for the Mizrahi community in terms of socioeconomic and political disparity vis-à-vis the Ashkenazi (European Jewish) minority. Asaf and Clayton feel by highlighting the issues of intra-Jewish oppression through the accessible and marketable history of the International Black Panther movement, their research will further help the conflict to be seen not as a simple border struggle between religious camps but rather as the Imperialist project that it is, where the only solution is a no-state solution.

Asaf is an Israeli American and a Mizrahi from an Iraqi Jewish family. The question of heritage, responsibility, and identity compel him to this project. He has been inspired by the struggle of the IBPfor a long time. As an undergraduate student at the University of California, he studied political science. He continues to organize with Students for Justice in Palestine and radical Jewish organizations in the Bay Area. He has spent many years in Palestine/Israel during various times in his life. He speaks, reads, and writes fluently in Hebrew, and therefore has access to numerous resources about the subject matter. Asaf believes in employing both practice and theory in antiauthoritarian work.

Clayton studied colonial legal theory at the University California at Santa Barbara under Lisa Hajjar and Wade Said, the son of Edward Said. He first published a research project in summer 2008 with the Palestinian Human Rights Monitoring Group that used critical race theory to point out the disparity in legal norms between Israeli and Palestinian youth engaged in lawful and unlawful protest. In addition to completing the research project, he also spent extensive time in Mizrahi neighborhoods, witnessing many of the project’s subject matter firsthand. While the continued oppression of the Mizrahi and Israeli-Ethiopian communities spur him to this historical research, it is his time spent working with the popular committees in the West Bank that give him hope for peace and justice in historical Palestine.


Translation of two chapters of Murray Bookchin’s The Ecology of Freedom―“Introduction” and “The Concept of Social Ecology"―into Russian
Nadia Shevchenko - $500

By combining various disciplines, including radical political theory and history with anthropology and environmental studies, The Ecology of Freedom makes a systematic and profound analysis of the causes, evolution, and consequences of structures of domination, while simultaneously offering a vision of an ecological society that is free, cooperative, and just. Even though anarchist and environmental movements in the West have been informed by Bookchin’s ideas and concepts since the 1980s, the majority of his works are still unknown to residents of the former USSR. This translation project will make the most fundamental parts of this work accessible to a Russian-speaking audience, and thereby enrich and radicalize movements as well as theoretical thought within this demographic.

Nadia has been active in the field of social ecology for the last twenty years, working with various social and environmental grassroots movement and NGOs in the former USSR and Eastern Europe, primarily through the radical environmental movement “Rainbow Keepers” (followers of Bookchin’s ideas), organizing public campaigns and direct actions, translating, and working for education and mobilization. She received a master’s degrees in mathematics from Kiev University and in environmental management and policy from Amsterdam University.


Outlaw Lives: Gender Self-determination, Queer Abolition, and Trans Resistance
Eric Stanley - $250

This essay will serve as an introduction to the emerging fields of study and organizing collecting under the umbrella of trans/queer prison abolition. Through an archival rereading of the 1969 Stonewall uprising, Eric will argue that the “Stonewall” moment was one example of a long history of queer abolition. While the contemporary moment of assimilation and police cooperation is produced via mainstream LGBT organizations, this essay will work to undo this logic and offer its alternative. Finally, Eric will work to build a theory of gender self-determination as an embodied theoretical and political idea that must be at the center of any and all radical analysis.

Eric is finishing a PhD in the history of consciousness department at the University of California at Santa Cruz, and is the codirector with Chris Vargas of the films Homotopia (2006) and Criminal Queers (2011). Eric’s writing has been published in the journal Social Text and in numerous anthologies.


Genoa Ten Years Later: Lessons Learned for International Legal Support,” by Thomas
Thomas - $500

Through a series of interviews and analysis of related literature, Thomas will review the progress that the Genoa legal support team has made in mass defense projects over the past ten years since the G-8 summit in July 2001, where hundreds were arrested and many were tortured, and will assess the specific challenges of defending against international conspiracy charges.

Thomas, a law student at the University of California Hastings College of the Law, was inspired to work in the law after his experience as a surviving witness to the infamous “Diaz School Raid” in Genoa 2001. Thomas is excited about the continuing movement to end the use of the cages into which we put land, people, animals, and ideas.


Steps Toward Community-Worker-Led Conversion of the Energy-Intensive Industries, Collective Control of Production, Reparations, and De-Growth: Detroit and the World
Kolya Abramsky - $500

Detroit is an appropriate place to start this discussion, owing to its rich history of struggle against one of the major energy industries (the automobile sector), and the fact that this industry’s future (both in Detroit and elsewhere) is intimately tied to the evolution of the economic-financial crisis as well as the possible ways out of it—ways that could be either emancipatory or authoritarian. The process of building a new energy system, based on greatly expanded uses of renewable energies, has the potential to make an important contribution to a wider process of constructing emancipatory relations of production, exchange, and livelihood in response to the crisis. The kind of massive and rapid reductions in CO2 emissions needed will not be possible without far-reaching changes in production and consumption relations at a more general level. Yet this is unlikely unless key means of generating and distributing wealth and subsistence are under some form of common, collective, and participatory decision making and ownership plus are decommodified. The alliances and political perspectives necessary to push such a process do not currently exist. This essay, then, hopes to contribute to bringing together specific social sectors—such as trade union members, self-organized worker organizations, community-oriented reconstruction initiatives in communities affected by the decline of energy-intensive industries; community and worker-oriented renewable energy organizations, and researchers and analysts—to explicitly confront unequal relationships while understanding how an industrial conversion process can be linked to the question of reparations to affected communities and workers.

Kolya has worked for over a decade with a range of grassroots social and environmental organizations, including educational work, international mobilizations, publications, and translations. For the last seven years he has focused on energy. He recently edited Sparking a Worldwide Energy Revolution: Social Struggles in the Transition to a Post-Petrol World (AK Press) and was the editor of Restructuring and Resistance: Diverse Voices of Struggle in Western Europe. Currently, Kolya is coordinating a global process, Toward a Worldwide Energy Revolution, aimed at building long-term alliances for an anticapitalist transition process to a new energy system. He was a visiting fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies in Science, Technology, and Society, in Graz, Austria, and received a master’s degree in sociology from the State University of New York, Binghamton. In 2006 he was the coordinator for the Danish-based World Wind Energy Institute.


Women, Love, and Anarchism: British Feminism, c. 1968–1978
Emma Dixon - $500

This project will principally investigate the influence of anarchist thought on British feminism in the period circa 1968–1978 and the emergence of an anarcha-feminist movement. It will initially examine the origins of the British feminist movement: who were the women involved, and what were their social and political backgrounds? Many were part of socialist, communist, or anarchist organizations before turning to, or being pushed toward, their own feminist groups. This meant that British second-wave feminism was distinctly left wing, with anarchism playing a prominent role. The project will analyze several feminist texts in the forms of newsletters, newspapers, magazines, zines, pamphlets, posters, books, and oral interviews in order to trace the existence of anarchist thought, and will produce an original study of the birth of British anarcha-feminism. It will therefore demonstrate the different ways in which the sexes interpreted anarchist thought within this time period, and show how feminists can use anarchism to assist with their fight for a better place in society.

Emma is a PhD student and part-time tutor at Bangor University, and her research focuses on twentieth-century British anarchism and feminism. She started studying anarchism as her special subject during my BA history degree (completed in June 2008), when she also pursued a dissertation exploring feminism in postwar Britain: “The Low Tide before the Second Wave? British Feminist Activity after the Second World War.” This interest in anarchism and feminism led to the completion of an MA dissertation in September 2009 exploring Emma Goldman’s time in Wales during the 1920s: “Red Emma and the Red Dragon: Emma Goldman and Wales,” and she also taught a seminar about anarchism to third-year students at Bangor University during this time. Emma is currently researching her PhD thesis, “Women, Love, and Anarchism: British Counterculture in the 1960s and 1970s,” due for completion in September 2012.


Across Three Decades of Anarchism, v. 2: Lessons Learned from the Wooden Shoe Collective
James Generic - $500

Five years ago, James wrote a history of the Wooden Shoe Collective, an infoshop collective in Philadelphia active since 1976. In this piece, he’ll update that history to include lessons learned since 2004, such as around issues of identity in collectives, utilizing his own personal experiences as well as interviews with current and past Wooden Shoe collective staffers. James will also argue that the idea of having a strong structure in place actually helps to keep a group democratic, increases the ability of a project to take on larger tasks, and prevents strong personalities from dominating a group. Specifically, he’ll contend that establishing a good structure is important to building good chemistry and trust; giving more control to those who put in a lot of work and have been in a group for at least six months; having a good mechanism for someone who wants to get more involved, and learn new skills and abilities; and providing decent ways of dealing with “hard-to-work-with” members. Those groups that do not have such structures in place are doomed, in his view, to start from scratch every few years, experience high turnover and burnout rates, and suffer organizational collapse. He also intends to use this history to show that well-run horizontal, democratic organizations actually function much better than hierarchical ones.

James grew up on a sheep farm in Northeast Pennsylvania until he was fourteen years old, when his family moved to the Philadelphia area, where he’s been ever since. He was politicized at a young age by listening to right-wing talk radio, although he went in the opposite direction. James joined the Wooden Shoe collective in late 2000 and has been apart of it ever since; he’s also involved in a variety of other groups, including Philadelphia Jobs with Justice. He has participated in most aspects of the Wooden Shoe collective at one point or another during the last ten years, and today is an active member of the Wooden Shoe’s events committee.


Alternatives to Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
Rosehip Medic Collective - $500

As radical movements seek ways to reduce our reliance on police and other oppressive institutions, we must also critically address corporate- and state-administered health and safety. Corporate health care restricts access, and alienates people from health/wellness knowledge and resources, while promoting a disease-focused and at times dehumanizing as well as nonconsenusal notion of “care.” At the intersection of medical and emergency management (police, fire, and disaster response) systems, EMS are frequently left treating those least served by other medical institutions, while further enforcing gender, race, class, political, and physical/mental ability categories on people experiencing emergencies and chronic illness. Through interviews and research, this project will examine the history of EMS, compare its idealized mission with the lived experiences of patients and providers, and explore a variety of tried, existing, and potential alternatives. Ultimately, this project aims to help (re)imagine and develop true communities of care and mutual aid.

The Rosehip Medics are a collective of volunteer street medics and health care activists in and around the occupied region known to some as Portland, Oregon. The collective provides first-aid and emergency care at protests, direct actions, and other sites of resistance and struggle. It also trains other street medics and offers community wellness trainings. Rosehip believes in democratizing health care knowledge and skills, in reducing its community’s dependence on corporate medicine, and that strong networks of support and care are essential to building sustainable, liberatory movements. The collective is working to create one facet of the healthy and diverse infrastructure necessary to building the world we want to see.


Keesha and Joanie and Jane
Judith Arcana - $500

This story (fiction, set in the present/near future) will be about young women, working for reproductive justice in the United States, who seek out other women who did underground/pre-Roe abortion work. The younger women are more diverse by race and ethnicity than their elders, so all have to deal with their differences as they discuss action and policy. The themes explored will include the necessary struggle to work together across generations on the dire status of reproductive health/freedom in the United States, grassroots efforts to deal with thehorrific politics of pregnancy in the United States, and the consistent use of domestic terrorism and assassination by the antiabortion movement.

Judith writes poems, stories, essays, and books; among the latter are What If Your Mother, a collection of poems and monologues about abortion, miscarriage, and the biotechnology of childbirth, and Grace Paley’s Life Stories, A Literary Biography. Most recent is 4th Period English, a chapbook of poems written in the voices of characters (high school students) talking about immigration and related themes. Judith is a coeditor for poetry at ON THE ISSUES: The Progressive Woman’s Magazine online. She was a jane (a worker in the pre-Roe abortion underground in Chicago) for two years, and continues to write, speak, and teach about reproductive health and justice. Born and raised in the Great Lakes region, she lives now in the Pacific Northwest. Her Web site is http://www.juditharcana.com.


Class, Nationalism, and the Popular Indigenous Council of Oaxaca—Ricardo Flores Magón
Eric Larson - $500

As the neocolonial shadow of the North American Free Trade Agreement hung over the United States and Mexico in the 1990s, new indigenous and workers’ groups surfaced to confront the generalized dispossession of the era. In this essay, Eric will examine the indigenous organization that emerged as perhaps the strongest popular force of the period in Oaxaca, Mexico—a state that borders Chiapas in this heavily indigenous and desperately poor region of the country. Like the Zapatista National Liberation Army (EZLN), which led a revolt in 1994, the Popular Indigenous Council of Oaxaca—Ricardo Flores Magón embraced ideas of indigenous autonomy and class-based mobilization, and adapted them to local conditions. This essay will explore how CIPO-RFM organizers in the late 1990s and early 2000s increasingly saw indigenous people not as a "class"—as did area Marxist groups—but as "peoples."

Eric is a graduate student at Brown University and an adjunct professor. He was in Oaxaca in 2006 and 2007, and continues to work with various organizing efforts in the state.


In Search of King Ludd
David Meiran - $500

"In Search of King Ludd" investigates the spirited culture of resistance to industrial capitalism that flourished during the "Luddite" uprising in northern England from 1811–13. Drawing on fresh interpretations of primary sources as well as the songs and writings of the Luddites themselves, David will demonstrate that the Luddites—croppers, hatters, stockingers, weavers, and other artisans—developed a culture of resistance that was decentralized, affinity based, and direct-action oriented. The essay will also trace the unprecedented state repression of the Luddities that much like today's repression of anarchists, involved thousands of troops, spies, a subversion of the legal system, information warfare, and more. David will show that the Luddites’ objections to the increasing mechanization of their crafts went beyond the concern that machines were stealing their livelihood and ruining their way of life (which, in fact, the machines did). As the state repression intensified and the Luddites' bonds of affinity strengthened, Luddites came to realize that they were engaged in a pitched battle against an emerging "Megamachine" with far-reaching implications—a megamachine that was nourished by Adam Smith's "invisible hand," England's endless wars for empire, and the betrayal of the liberal merchant class. Finally, the essay will consider the legacy of the Luddites and implications for contemporary resistance to today's megamachine.

David is an activist, writer, and producer living in Pittsburgh. His research and activism focuses on the ever-increasing repression and oppression of everyday life that is enhanced by robotics, intelligent systems, "less-lethal" weapons, and other technology associated with the U.S. military, law enforcement, and the health care system.


Occupy Everything! Factory Occupations and Worker Self-management in Latin America: Strategies for Social Emancipation
Marie Trigona - $500

The current economic crisis has accelerated the development of new alternative forms of production as workers throughout the world engage in factory occupations as a viable direct action to defend workers’ rights and transform social relations. Argentina in particular offers one of the longest-lived experiences of direct worker management with more than two hundred permanent worker occupations. This essay will explore the motivations and strategies for workers’ collective actions and struggles for emancipation. It will closely examine case studies of worker occupations in their structures of democratic planning, relationship to the state, traditions of syndicalism and working-class resistance, network building with other worker organizations, (re)signifying working-class knowledge, and the construction of new social relations. The workplace takeovers provide examples of innovative approaches to labor organizing and lessons of strategies to resist the metamorphosing nature of neoliberal capital, essentially challenging the entire premise of modes of production within a capitalist society.

Marie is a journalist, filmmaker, radio producer, translator, and organizer whose work is inspired by international anarchist working-class history and anti-imperialist struggles. Her media work focuses on labor, human rights, community media, and social movements in Latin America. She has published a number of articles on workers’ self-management in Latin America, including the essay "FASINPAT (Factory without a Boss): An Argentine Experience in Self-management" in Real Utopia: Participatory Society for the 21st Century (AK Press). Currently residing in Buenos Aires, her adopted home, she is a graduate student at the Latin American School of Social Sciences.


Stones and Flowers: Confronting the Crisis
David Zlutnick and Ian Paul - $500

David and Ian will be producing three separate texts as contributions to an upcoming journal being collected and edited by the larger Friendly Fire Collective on the topic of antiauthoritarian organizing against the U.S. financial crisis. The journal will be published before and distributed during the U.S. Social Forum this June. One text will be the journal's introduction, written by both Ian and David, outlining the crisis while also contextualizing the rest of the submissions by asserting that the radical Left has failed to put forth a large-scale and effective resistance to the crisis. In Ian's piece, it will be argued that if anarchists aim to be effective in their campaigns against the crisis, both local and national organizing will have to be further developed. David’s article will address precarity in the United States, looking at possibilities to relieve social and economic insecurity in the immediate term while developing sustained, long-term revolutionary community organizing.

Ian is an artist, activist, and writer currently living in San Francisco. He has been involved in a variety of social justice struggles over the last decade, actively participating in the antiwar, environmental justice, and anticapitalist movements. Ian is involved in various forms of anarchist organizing in the Bay Area, works with Unconventional Action in the Bay, and is also a founding member of the Friendly Fire Collective. He is currently pursuing his MFA and MA at the San Francisco Art Institute.

David has almost a decade of experience in social justice movements, including anarchist organizing, labor struggles, antimilitarism, and housing justice. He currently works with Unconventional Action in the Bay and cofounded the Friendly Fire Collective. David has a strong history within independent media, working with numerous publications and producing multiple documentary films, most recently through Upheaval Productions. He lives in San Francisco, and works with the Tenants Union and the Eviction Defense Collaborative.


Sienvolando: Snapshots of Art Actions, Popular Power, and Collaborative Networks in Argentina
Kelly Anne Mifflin - $500

This essay will serve as a check-in with one group in relation to and beyond Argentina’s uprisings in December 2001. Revisiting the energy and momentum inspired by earlier actors, KellyAnne will explore the transition between a large-scale, yet contextually motivated movement to smaller but more permanent projects. Sienvolando is an art action group in La Plata, Argentina, that intervenes on public space, often in the form of murals, to reclaim space and communicate with its city on a level outside the mass media. It responds to immediate events both at a local and global level by working within a loose informal network of social justice organizations, and providing the visual and creative component to various struggles. This takes many forms, such as single-day illegal murals in response to government inaction, repression, and structural violence, collaborative murals for community centers, stencils and graffiti during demonstrations, and woodblocks to print in the street at festivals. Sienvolando and the groups it collaborates with are smaller in scale than their horizontal predecessors, but they have had five years to practice, assess, and redefine what it means to work autonomously and collectively. Through an analysis of the work of Sienvolando, KellyAnne will explore the use of networks and the concept of a frente (front) as a form of organizing. Working within a frente allows for a flexibility of goals and strategies without forcing unity or diverging over differences, opens space for many forms of engagement and discourse to respond with direct action around the city. This essay will refer back to Argentina’s recent history, but will emphasize what work is going on now and how people are re-articulating their movements “post post-crisis.”

KellyAnne spent much of 2007 and 2008 participating in various community organizations in Buenos Aires. In 2008 she spent time painting and thinking with Sienvolando, and later wrote her undergraduate thesis on three art-centered urban social justice groups in the greater Buenos Aires area. She currently lives in Philadelphia.


Organizing against Capitalism: Translation of Eric Duran’s Creating a Counterhegemonic Economic System
Scott Pierpont - $500

This translation will make available Enric Duran’s“Planteando un sistema económico contrahegemónico” (2008) in English. The essay presents strategies for popular movements to organize economic institutions that not only provide alternatives to capitalism but also constituent a counterhegemonic force that can replace it. Informed by radical political economy, Chartalist “money as debt” theory, and the ecological imperative of “de-growth,” the essay examines the shortcomings of previous alternative economic networks, situating them in the current regime of debt-driven money creation, private property, and continual economic expansion. Duran proposes a regional counterhegemonic economy in Catalonia, suggesting a coherent network of cooperatives, alternative currencies, ecological sustainable production, and autonomous municipalities. The essay will include an introduction outlining Duran’s act of “financial civil disobedience” in September 2008, and contemporary efforts to organize debtors and bank users in Spain’s “We Can Live without Capitalism” campaign.

Scott is an organizer, translator, and writer. He works with the Philadelphia-based radical newspaper The Defenestrator ( http://defenestrator.org ), and has given numerous popular education classes and workshops on economics.


Futures Not (Yet) Chosen: An Antiauthoritarian Vision for South Africa
Taylor Sparrow - $500

This essay will examine the possibility of revolutionary change in South Africa toward a radical increase in social participation in decision making, economics, and education. Drawing on broader theoretical contributions from historical and present-day anarchists, the focus will be on the life and thought of Richard Turner, a radical activist assassinated in Durban in 1978. Turner called for a utopia in which hierarchy is eliminated as much as possible; a radically de-centralized polity and economy, which would rely on widespread structures of cooperative decision-making and management. I propose writing an essay which will do the following: * explain and analyze "participatory democracy," as Turner conceived it, in depth and * to put this vision in relation to related proposals for ending capitalism without seizing power, vanguard parties, etc. * further, these theoretical concepts should be discussed in relation to investigating both the activist efforts that Turner involved himself in and social movements and upheavals (past and present) that shed light on the potential of moving towards a participatory democratic society.

Taylor is a historian, poet, and autonomist raised white in the United States. He worked for three years for Firestarter Press, producing materials principally for prisoners, and was both a student and a teacher at the School for Designing a Society, a space for developing radical and non-doctrinaire visions for ending capitalism. He continues to try to find constructive (and destructive, where applicable) ways to disrupt and oppose the fundamentally unjust and undignified society in which he – and we – now live.


"A Prisoner With a Noble Face": Oscar Wilde and the Victorian Prison
Kristian Williams - $1000

Drawing from Oscar Wilde's writings, his biography, commentary by his contemporaries, and existing histories of the penitentiary, this essay will both recount the operations of the Victorian prison system, and examine Wilde's attitudes concerning -- not just prison -- but authority, punishment, and the state.

The Victorian prison is in many respects a forerunner to our prisons today. Hence nineteenth-century critiques both of conditions within the prisons (especially grueling physical labor and prolonged isolation) and of the prison's role in society are relevant to our understanding of the contemporary institutions. Wilde himself offered a layered critique -- arguing against specific conditions and practices, like the imprisonment of children and the poor quality of prison food, while also denouncing the structures of authority that created such conditions, the standards of morality that sought to justify them, and the degrading effect they had on the prisoners and on society alike. The contemporary prison abolition movement typically thinks of itself as beginning in the 1970s; earlier objections to the prison system, and their -- at one time obvious -- relation to critiques of the state per se have largely been forgotten.

Secondly, while Wilde is remembered today as a wit and a dandy, he is not general thought of as an anarchist, a political thinker, or an activist (though he was all three). He is sometimes portrayed as a martyr for the cause of gay rights, but the connection -- which Wilde himself saw so clearly -- between sexual freedom, freedom from economic servitude, and freedom from the state, is not generally elucidated. In short, Wilde's life and his work -- in particular his incarceration and his agitation for better conditions after his release -- offer a neat way to tie together gay rights, prison abolition, and anarchism.


Anarchist Lives in Manchester
Sarah Irving - $500

This proposal is being submitted as part of plans for a website of the radical history of the city of Manchester, UK. Despite being the site of the Peterloo Massacre, Chartist organisation activities, major suffragette figures and the first Pan-African Congress, Manchester's radical history is largely dislocated from its political present. This proposal is being presented by a member of the collective planning the website, for a section of the website concentrating on anarchists and allied activists in Manchester's history. The proposed 6,000 words would consist of a series of 10 interviews with lifelong anarchist activists from Manchester, each of 500-600 words, drawing in issues such as their political influences, the subjects they campaigned on, the biographical trajectories they followed and what their relationships were with other political movements in the city. The anarchist themed website section would site alongside and be interlinked with other planned streams, such sections on the peace movement, environmentalism and workers' struggles.


Battle of Seattle and Network Organizing: History and Lessons
David Solnit - $750

This essay will detail how the direct-action shutdown of the World Trade Organization meetings in Seattle in 1999 was organized, and what we can learn from it. It will tell the story of how decentralized, coordinated networks mobilized people to Seattle, and then coordinated the affinity groups, clusters, organizations, and people that participated in the streets. The essay will also look at the underlying principles of a network, different types of networks, how they work, and what is needed to create and maintain strong healthy networks as the foundation of powerful movements to create a better world. David's written work will contribute to the growing peoples' history of the Seattle WTO resistance by telling the story of organizing the shutdown from participating organizers' perspectives and thus will help to dispel media and activist myths about this mass mobilization.

David is a global justice, antiwar, arts, and direct-action organizer, author, puppeteer, performer, and trainer. He was a organizer in the shutdowns of the WTO in 1999 as well as San Francisco the day after Iraq was invaded in 2003, and a founder of Art and Revolution. Currently, he works with Direct Action to Stop the War and Courage to Resist, supporting GI resistance and promoting people power strategies to end the Iraq war and occupation. David writes for various periodicals, and edited the book "Globalize Liberation" (City Lights, 2004) and co-authored, with Aimee Allison, the book "Army of None" (Seven Stories Press, 2007).


Driven from Below
Andrea Gibbons - $750

Andrea Gibbons was born in Taos, New Mexico and grew up in Tucson, Arizona. She worked for three years with Central American refugees as a paralegal for the Central American Resource Center in Los Angeles, and did research for the Garment Worker's Center. Becoming the lead organizer and researcher for Strategic Actions for a Just Economy (SAJE), she organized tenants, reveled in popular education, uncovered slum housing empires, and helped create the Figueroa Corridor Community Land Trust. After a year in Glasgow to work on her resting and writing, she is now living once again in Los Angeles, where she continues working and writing for a more just world. She has a B.A. in Sociology and Anthropology from Swarthmore, and an M.A. in Urban Planning from UCLA, though she found an equally important education through her family's loss of their home when she was 17, and a wide and varied range of minimum wage jobs worked from an early age.


Conscientious Objection As a Human Right - A Logico-Anarchist Approach
Can Baskent - $500

In this essay, in a foundational level, I argue against the fact that conscientious objection should be justified as a basic human right. I will, on the other hand, claim that one do not need the assumptions related to the notion of 'human right' to justify the conscientious objection. The crucial point of this essay is to liberate the concept of consciention objection from (international) law. In other words, I will claim and show that no external conditions, be it the law or the religion, is necessary to justify the act of conscientious objection. Therefore, my approach will be a rather rationalist one. I believe, this is in essence and anarchist project - to liberate the concept from the domain of law and thus, to influence the conscientious objection movements which only focus on the legal aspects of the act.

Can Baskent is a Brooklyn based graduate student, lecturer and activist. His academic work focuses on various aspects of formal logic. In the domain of politics, he investigates the "applications" of anarchism in conscientious objection, sexuality and vegetariansim. Before moving to New York, he lived in Turkey and Amsterdam and was an active member of the movements there.


The Movement for a New Society: Consensus, Prefiguration, and Direct Action in the 1970s and 1980s
Andy Cornell - $500

West Philadelphia has long been known as a center of anarchist activity in the United States. This reputation is owed in large part to a network of longstanding radical institutions, including a food co-op, a meeting space, and cheap, collectively owned housing for activists that has proven central to promoting and sustaining radical organizing. Many of these institutions were created by the Movement for a New Society (MNS), a network of non-violent activists centered in West Philadelphia from 1971-1989 that worked for radical change on multiple fronts. MNS played a key role in training anti-nuke, environmental, and other activists in affinity group organizing, consensus decision making, and NVDA blockading techniques. Meanwhile, MNS forwarded a vision of a decentralized, democratic and caring social order by building cooperative communities based on anti-racist, feminist, and anti-capitalist values with the intent of prefiguring and modeling the social transformations members wanted to see on a broader scale. Though MNS dissolved in 1989, many of the institutions originated by the group continue to sustain local anarchist activities. More importantly, the organizational principles (consensus, affinity groups) articulated by MNS have become defining aspects, and are taken as second nature, in some strands of the contemporary U.S. anarchist milieu, as the Global Justice movement made clear. In this first detailed study of Movement for a New Society, I will assess the degree to which the group can be considered an anarchist organization itself, and consider what lasting impacts it has made on the theory and practice of anarchism in the United States.


Chinese Anarchist Periodicals
Daniel Cairns - $500

A high tide of anarchist activity in China occurred in the 1920s. Particularly in the early part of the decade, many students were so inspired by anarchist political critiques and cultural and social insights that they began publishing their own radical journals. Although many of these publications lasted only an issue or two and their content was largely derivative of existing writings, they proliferated in the universities of large cities across China. Sadly, there has been no systematic study of these journals. I suspect that more research into these journals would tell us much about what aspects of anarchism were most attractive to Chinese intellectuals and to what extent anarchism influenced China's political climate in spite of the growing communist hegemony of the period's politics. My project includes research into Chinese anarchist periodicals that emerged following the May Fourth Period, most of which will never have been translated into English. I will write an essay chronicling the ebb and flow of the radical tide in China as interpreted through the journals. Hopefully I can construct a comprehensive, annotated bibliography of the journals as well.


Apex: Locating Cascadia Forest Defense in Feminism, Anarchism, and Queer Theory
Amy Seidenverg - $500

This essay explores the recent history (1985-2006) of forest defense in the Pacific Northwest. Over the course of these two decades, radical ecological activism made significant theoretical and strategic shifts which challenge and contribute to feminism, ecofeminism, queer theory, and anarchism. As forest defense activists spoke out against the male dominance in the movement, they challenged not just individual men but the deep-seated patriarchal underpinnings of the environmental and eco-anarchist movements at large. Through a process of articulating patriarchy within their activist groups; separating from men into autonomous women- and transgender-only spaces; challenging men to take up feminist politics; and then reintegrating to work in coalition with men, these activists created deeply lived theories and political strategies which managed to affirm their goals as anarchists and feminists while successfully stopping timber sales. Importantly, women's and transgender activists created a 'separatism' which allowed them to create safe and empowering spaces and challenge sexism and sexual harassment in their communities while working with men who shared their goals. This noteworthy strategy transformed and strengthened their community rather than fracturing it. Forest defense in these years was a site on which many theories associated with academia were played out on the ground, contested, and used as tools along with such useful items as wrenches, truck rope and harnesses. A historical analysis combined with ecofeminist, feminist, anarchist, and queer theory elucidate an important theme for feminists and anarchists alike: the failure of single-issue politics. The objective of forest defense does not preclude or undermine the objective of feminism. Rather, forest defense provides a physical and cultural space to experiment with being feminist, anarchist, queer, and working together in non-authoritarian ways that mainstream society and mainstream spaces cannot as readily afford.


Anarkismo: Is There a Truly Filipino Anarchist Theory and Movement?
Noel Barcelona - $500

This essay will explore the evolution of anarchist theory and practice in the Philippines, examining its past and with a view toward its future. It will critically study questions such as: When did anarchist theory in the Filipino context emerge? Is there a truly Filipino anarchist theory? How concrete is the practice of anarchist theory here in the Philippines, and how does anarchism shape Filipino mass and revolutionary movements? What are the contradictions between anarchism and other current "leftist" theories in the Philippines?

Noel is a journalist living in Quezon City, the Philippines.

A Country Considered to be Free: A Transnational History of the IWW in Aotearoa, New Zealand
Mark Derby - $250

This essay will describe special features of the IWW in New Zealand such as the constant use of Maori language in its newspaper, and the huge impact of imported radical literature, which meant that IWW ideas and direct action strategies can be observed in parts of the country that never saw an actual member of the organization.

Mark works as a historical researcher for the Waitangi Tribunal, a New Zealand government institution that investigates and issues findings on claims by Maori of breaches of the Treaty of Waitangi (signed in 1840 by Maori chiefs and the British Crown), and is the union delegate for his workforce. Although New Zealand born and of Irish descent, he is a fluent speaker of the Maori language and holds a masters in New Zealand studies.

The Chicago Couriers Union: A Case Study in Solidarity Unionism
Colin Bossen - $500

This essay will offer a history and analysis of the Chicago Couriers Union (CCU). The CCU is a minority labor union of primarily bike couriers affiliated with the Chicago General Membership Branch of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW). Current membership of the CCU is approximately thirty-five, with the union able to draw on a larger network of workers for some actions. Due to both the nature of the courier industry and the ideological orientation of the union's organizers, the CCU has been organized using what Staughton Lynd has called "solidarity unionism." Solidarity unionism is the idea that workers have the most power when they organize around specific workplace grievances rather than struggle for legal recognition and the right to negotiate a contract. Using this model, the union has met with modest success, and over the past three year it has built a small but stable base of militant workers in the industry and won several small victories including a wage hike effecting approximately one hundred workers at the third-largest courier company in Chicago. This essay will examine the CCU as an example of solidarity unionism, chronicle its success and failures, and suggest the lessons the union has to offer anti-authoritarian and anarchist workplace organizers. Perhaps most important, this essay will make information about the CCU widely available for the first time.

From late 2003 to summer 2005, Colin was a volunteer organizer for the CCU. In addition, from spring 2005 to the end of 2006, he served as chair of the IWW/s Organizing Department Formation Committee, the committee tasked by the union's General Assembly and General Executive Board to develop an Organizing Department. In this capacity, Colin surveyed dozens workers engaged in organizing projects using direct action organizing models and helped compile an authoritative report on the state of contemporary IWW organizing. Colin also earned a BA with a double major in physics and English at Denison University, and an M.Div from the Meadville Lombard Theological School (affiliated with the University of Chicago). His published writings include "Temporary Autonomous Zones and the Power of Ritual," Journal of Liberal Religion; The Bridging Program (Boston: UUA, 2004); and "Witness and Memory." Also, from January to June 2006, Colin served as a regular panelist for the Long Beach Press Telegram's weekly "Ask the Clergy" column.

You Are Your Own Worst Enemy: The Use of "Self-Abuse" as a Mask to Institutional Culpability at Eastern State Penitentiary and Guantanamo Bay
Emily Abendroth - $500

This essay will examine the parallels between prison conditions at Eastern State Penitentiary (ESP) in the nineteenth century and at Guantanamo Bay today, particularly in regard to the two institutions' attempts to shape and mitigate public perceptions of the circumstances individual incarcerated persons faced within. When it opened in 1829, Philadelphia's ESP was the first solitary confinement prison of its kind, and represented the "first wave" of the great experiment and societal commitment to incarceration/imprisonment as a response to crime. Almost immediately, public concerns were raised that the extreme isolation and sensory deprivation that prisoners were being subjected to was leading to the degradation of both their physical and mental health. In order to obfuscate those numbers and exonerate the institution itself from any culpability in the matter, ESP prison physicians frequently attributed individual cases of illness, psychosis, and even fatality to "masturbation" and/or "self-abuse." This cloaking or modification of the numbers for the benefit of the institution's public image is recognizably not a new phenomenon, and continues to be recycled in the U.S. penal system today in order to obscure its brutality. In fact, in 2002, this term "self-abuse" or "self-harm" returned to the records of prison physicians as a means of downplaying the startlingly high number of suicide attempts taking place at Guantanamo Bay. This essay will use this overlapping, though differently contextualized term "self-abuse" as a lens for exploring how these two institutions and the criminal justice system generally has attempted to write off any culpability on the part of itself or the larger society, and instead attempt to inscribe all guilt on to the individual incarcerated body, even to the most extreme point of their own mortality.

Emily has been involved in anti-police brutality and prison justice organizing work in a variety of capacities for more than a decade. In the Bay Area, she spent many years as an active member of Copwatch: teaching know-your-rights classes, helping people document their cases of experienced brutality, and actively walking the streets observing police interactions as a means to de-escalate the likelihood of violence. In Philadelphia, Emily currently works with Books through Bars, and is also part of an ad hoc organizing committee working to set up a month-long calendar of coordinated events around prison justice issues for March 2007. Called "Justice Month," the festival (which will be the first of its kind in the region) is aimed at increasing public awareness of the criminal justice and incarceration systems as they exist and alternatives to them. She has also worked as a historical docent/tour guide at ESP in Philly, and thus has received extensive (though quite "filtered") training regarding the history of the site, and has had unique access to the on-site historical archives for this essay's topic.

Man! and the International Group: 1930s' American Anarchism and State Repression in a Climate of Fear
Hillary Lazar - $1,000

One of the great misconceptions of American radical history is that by the 1930s, the anarchist movement petered out, becoming little more than a whisper of dissent and smattering of communitarian settlements until its resurgence in the 1960s. This article's examination of the previously unexplored California-based International Group and its organ, Man! A Journal of the Anarchist Ideal and Movement, will refute this perception, and be a testament to the existence of a vibrant and widespread American anarchist movement during this period. It will also bring to light the intense several-year political persecution of Marcus Graham, editor of Man!, as well as his associates Vincenzo (Vincent) Ferrero and Domenick Sallitto, and the nationwide protest movement that grew in response to their harassment by the federal and local government. In so doing, this article will not only restore a vital moment of radical protest to history, but will serve as a case study for state repression and the U.S. governmental response to times of crisis and a climate of fear.

Hillary is a freelance researcher and project consultant for numerous historical and educational institutions. Her master's degree work focused on topics such as a comparative analysis of women in Latin American anarchist movements, an examination of nineteenth-centur anti-slavery communitarian experiments, and the start of her investigation of Man!

Development in South Africa
Mandisi Majavu - $250

Majavu will examine ways in which South Africa has benefited or been harmed by international financial institutions like the IMF, World Bank, and the WTO. He will contrast that trajectory with a vision of how South Africa could have developed if a participatory economics agenda had been implemented after1994.
Majavu is a culture critic based in Cape Town, South Africa. His social critique borrows heavily from the anarchist tradition.

Self-Governance in Exile: The Western Saharan Refugees, Thirty Years Later
Jacob Mundy - $500

Since 1976, nearly half the indigenous population of Western Sahara has lived in exile in four self-managed refugee camps in Algeria. Their relatives and friends, the other half of the divided population, still live under Moroccan occupation in what is Africa's last official colony, Western Sahara. In the four Sahrawi refugee camps small spaces of political autonomy ceded by Algeria the Western Saharan independence movement (Polisario Front) has committed itself to a now thirty-year-old experiment in prefigurative self-governance. Unlike any other refugees experiences in the world, the Western Saharan refugees who inhabit the camps manage their daily lives without direct help from the international community. At the same time, they participate in the political structures of their own liberation movement from daily meetings in tent groups to the National Congress held every three years. The refugees claim that the camps model the very society an independent Western Sahara will achieve once Morocco withdraws. But is this really the case? Grounded in Mundy's research experience in the camps, this essay will try to answer that question and access the lessons from the Western Sahara refugees experiment in grassroots democracy.

Mundy is the coauthor of a forthcoming book on Western Sahara with Stephen Zunes. This fall, he will begin his PhD studies at the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom. Originally from Seattle, he currently resides in San Jose, California, with his partner and their two dogs.

Queering the X: James Baldwin, Malcolm X and the Third World
Kazembe Balagun - $350.00

The essay is an intellectual intervention in the debates about gender, race and sexuality. By promoting an intertextual dialogue between Malcolm X and Baldwin, the essay will foreground the queer influences in both men's analysis of racial oppression. Showing how both Malcolm and James' vision of a just society included aspects of an erotic, the essay will shift much of the rhetorical essentialism from both men's work and illustrate means by which radical/revolutionary activists can use both in an anti-authoritarian framework.

Balagun is a New York-based cultural historian and frequently contributes articles to the NYC Indypendent and is a member of Estacion-Libre People of Color in Solidarity with Chiapas.

Rolling for the Revolution: A Transnational History of Cuban Cigarmakers in Havana, South Florida and New York City, 1868-1895
Evan Daniel - $350.00

From the late nineteenth to early twentieth century, Cuban torcedores (cigar makers) exemplified the highly autonomous work culture of skilled artisans and their newspapers and workplace orators, or lectors, articulated an explicitly internationalist anarchist ideology. Despite this internationalist orientation, Cuban cigar makers played a pivotal role in the fight against Spanish rule by raising funds, disseminating propaganda, and eventually participating in armed struggle. This essay will ask how and why Cuban cigar makers who were anarchist internationalists eventually supported a nationalist endeavor, adopting and adapting both anarchism and nationalism in order to respond to their changing social and material realities.

Daniel lives in New York City, where he is a processing archivist at the Tamiment Library/ Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives at New York University and a Ph.D. student in History and Political Science at the New School for Social Research.

Zapatista Spring: Autonomy and a Water Project
Ramor Ryan - $350.00

The essay will tell the story of a solidarity project to install a potable water system in a Zapatista base community located on occupied land. Offering their technical knowledge, their solidarity and enthusiasm for the Zapatista struggle for autonomy and self-determination, a group of anarchists from Mexico City, the US and Europe were sent by the Zapatista Revolutionary Clandestine Committee to the village of Rafael Moreno deep within the Lacandon Jungle. Living and working with the companeras for 10 weeks, the activists experienced rebel joy and the wretched hardships of abject poverty in equal measure. "Zapatista Spring" will explore the notion of international solidarity, and examine questions provoked by the water project experience: how are meaningful bridges of solidarity built between privileged activists of the North and those of the disadvantaged South? When is solidarity no more than charity, and when does it really help build autonomy?

Ryan is based in Dublin, Ireland. Over the past ten years, he has travelled extensively throughout Latin America and has worked on a dozen water projects in different regions of the autonomous municipalities of Chiapas. His book Clandestines: The Pirate Journals of an Irish Exile, for which he received an IAS grant in 2002, has been contracted by AK Press and will be published in spring 2006.

Listening to an Enforced Silence: Ba-Jin in Communist China
Daniel Burton-Rose - $1,500.00

The project will collect the insights of Li Feigan an anarchist organizer who employs the pen name "Ba Jin" and has become a central figure in twentieth-century Chinese literature. Ba Jin's vision of a cooperative, egalitarian society, and his critique of both communism and capitalism, continue to be valuable sources of insight and inspiration for people working for justice. Listening to an Enforced Silence will focus on the least documented period of Ba Jin's life, from 1949 to the present, and will provide a valuable addition to the small body of English-language scholarship available on Ba Jin. It will allow English-speaking anarchists to learn about and engage with a dissident force in a state that is rapidly ascending as a global political and economic superpower.

Black Star Rising: People of Color and Radical Resistance
Heather Villalobos - $500.00
This project is an exploration of how radical and anarchist politics affect the lives of people of color. A selection of oral history interviews with people of color involved in community struggles will be published in an anthology, and used to examine aspects of the experience of oppression as well as the possibilities for movements for self-determination and freedom. A broader collection of oral histories will be transcribed and published online (www.blackstarrising.org).

Anarchist Trade Unions in Bolivia: 1920-1950
Melissa Forbis & Cale Layton - $2,275.00
This is a translation of Los artesanos libertarios y la ética del trabajo by Zulema Lehm and Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui (1988). The book presents the history of anarchism in Bolivia and includes numerous interviews with trade union participants from the period of 1920-1950. The translation will include a new introduction that links this history to the recent uprising and continued resistance in Bolivia, and will be the first English translation of a book on Bolivian anarchism and libertarian trade unions.

Recording Carceral Landscapes
Trevor Paglen - $1,600.00
This book will offer a collection of images and texts that make visible the social, political, and economic relationships that constitute California’s massive prison system. In showing how prisons are connected to the foundational structures of society itself, Carceral Landscapes will suggest that prison abolition isn’t simply about closing prisons, but about fundamentally transforming the relations that order contemporary society. In addition to serving as a companion book for an art show by the same name (to open at San Francisco’s “The Lab” in February 2005), it will be used by the prison-abolition organization Critical Resistance for outreach and education.

Between Sisyphus and Self-Management: The Relevance of Autonomous Organization in a Globalized World
Stevphen Shukaitis - $1,000.00
This book-length project is an effort to reflect, in the domain of economics, on the question: “What structures and practices could sustain the creation of a new social order?” It will examine the historical legacies and practices of worker self-management to assess the usefulness of the concept under the current conditions of economic globalization. The book will draw on examples of self-management in 1930s Spain, 1960s Yugoslavia, and Argentina in 2001, as well as current organizing efforts, to elaborate a contemporary theory of self-management.

Anarchism: A Documentary History
Robert Graham - $2,000.00
This two volume project will assemble the definitive texts of the anarchist tradition and organizes them chronologically and thematically. It will include English translations of classical anarchist essays that have never before been published. These include substantial selections from Chines, Japanes, Korean, and Latin American texts, as well as essays by Otto Gross, Gustav Landauer, and Diego Abad de Sántillan. The books will be published by Black Rose Books.

Gender in the Czech Anarchist Movement
Marta Kolářová - $750.00
The article will describe the Czech anarchist movement from a gender perspective, and analyze the movement in terms of women’s participation in movement organizations, the gendered division of activist labor, and the representation of women in anarchist publications. It will be published in pamphlet form and on the Czechoslovakian Anarchist Federation’s website www.csaf.cz.

Global Finance Capital and the Permanent War:
The Dollar, Wall Street and the War Against Irak
Kolya Abramsky - $1,000.00
This translation project will make available Ramon Fernandez Duran's Spanish work of the same title in English. In Global Finance Capital and the Permanent War, Duran shows how the dollar, and financial institutions such as Wall Street and the IMF, force global capitalism into a permanent state of war in order to maintain its hegemonic control of the international marketplace. This study shows the emerging tensions between capitalist powers while contributing to international anticapitalist resistance through the advancement of communally and democratically controlled economies of solidarity.

19 and 20:
Notes for the New Social Protagonism
Nate Holdren - $1,000.00
This translation project will make available the Argentinian group Colectivo Situaciones' Spanish book on the eruptions in Argentina on the 19th and 20th of December 2001. The insights offered by this group on these important days that shook the world is particularly important as the CS are a collective of militant intellectuals who participated in these events and continue to be active in Argentinian anticapitalist movements. CS' autonomist marxist politics attempts to to do away with hierarchical and vanguardist baggage, suffered by other within the autonomist tradition, brings it very close to contemporary anarchism. The theoretical insights of CS provides rich material that anarchists can employ in understanding and challenging the capitalist world.

Horizontalism:
Voices of Popular Power in Argentina
Marina Sitrin - $2,000.00
Through interviews, this book length project brings together various activists involved in the Argentinian autonomous social movements. The movements are some of the most innovative and visionary with regards to the politics of creation, inventing a new political conversation with regards to power and hierarchy, as well as democracy. The neighborhood assemblies, movements of unemployed workers, and occupied factories movements are all organizing in ways that are consciously directly democratic and autonomous, naming this politics, horizontalidad. This collection of interviews both helps to represent these movements while also adding to the global conversation on means of resistance.

Rage at Dawn
Errol Schweitzer - $1,200.00
This work of historical fiction presents two major themes: the attempt to reform and organize against the present structure of oppression and construction of a libertarian and egalitarian alternative. Schweitzer hopes to present anarchist ideas in a way that can be related to everyday life. Schweitzer is a writer and activist and has worked with youth in a Bronx community center for the past thirteen years.

Anarchy, Revolution, Freedom:
Towards Anarchist Cultural Theory
Sandra Jeppesen - $800.00
This project expands upon anarchist cultural theory. It looks at both mainstream and explicitly anarchist representations of revolution to try to come to an understanding of anarchist culture and to develop a means of theorizing in a way that is significantly different from Marxian cultural studies, in both approach and political analysis. Jeppesen is a doctoral student at York University in Toronto.

Black Roses Black Masks:
The American Anarchist Movement and its Media in the Vietnam Years
Justin Jackson - $1,000.00
This project compiles an edited collection of writing, poetry, art and images from anarchist press in the United States between 1945 to 1980, with a focus on the 1960s and 1970s. It includes a lengthy introduction on the underground anarchist press of the 1960s. Jackson is a writer and activist who currently lives in Detroit, Michigan.

Building New Contexts for Anarchist Graphics, Video and Film
Josh McPhee - $1,000.00
This is a three-essay collection on anarchism and aesthetics. These essays focus on how anarchist cultural products are produced in a world defined by visual literacy, how this relates to capitalism’s use of design and art to “brand” ideas and products, and how anti-authoritarian signs and signifiers compare and compete. MacPhee is an artist and activist living
in Chicago.

Direct Action:
The Search for Radical Renewal
Leslie A. Kauffman - $2,000.00
Direct Action provides a comprehensive history of direct action protest in the United States over the past few decades. The work draws on more than 100 interviews conducted by the author with organizers, as well as primary source material. The book will provides tools to with which we may reclaim the rich and largely forgotten history of direct action movements, to make movements more effective, and to pose fundamental challenges to the existing order and create models for a society based on mutual aid and respect. Kauffman is an accomplished writer and activist of over 20 years.

Globalization and its Discontents
Ramor Ryan - $2,000.00
The book is comprised of a collection of stories of resistance to capitalism compiled over the last 15 years. Starting with first-hand experiences of the Anti-Imperialist struggles for national liberation in the 1980’s and 1990’s (Ireland, Nicaragua, Kurdistan), and ending with the recent wave of protests against globalization, Ryan analyzes the shortcomings of these movements from a radical, anti-authoritarian perspective. Ryan uses his own political travels and experiences to share stories of revolution, resistance, and freedom while expressing profound solidarity and compassion. He currently lives in New York and Chiapas.

Many Manifestations:
Blueprints for a Bricoleur’s War Machine
Sean Gauthier - $1,000.00
As opposed to most contemporary scholars, Gauthier questions whether the process and development of globalization inherent in late capitalism is unavoidable (as it is often assumed). Informed by such thinkers as Foucault and Deleuze, Gauthier critiques globalization and the arguments which maintain it, and in turn, draw out effective strategies for resistance. In many ways, this project may be viewed as a post-structuralist anarchist response to Hardt and Negri’s Empire.

Voicing Exclusion(s):
A Critical Examination of Current Discourses on the “Anti-Corporate Globalization” Movement
Ali Sauer - $1,000.00
In this study, Sauer investigates how social movements in general, and the “anti-globalization movement” in particular, reproduce certain structures of domination by the very way such movements define themselves—by a discourse of inclusivity. Her project, which consists of interviews and research, attempts to understand the limitations of such discourses, and suggest ways in which they may be redefined to become more relevant and powerful. Overall, this project encourages a radical redefinition of anti-globalization activism that recognizes, in a non-colonial manner, the range of people engaged in this work.

Anarchism and the Black Revolution
Lorenzo Komboa Ervin - $2,000.00
This book length project is a rewrite of the pamphlet of the same name, first published in 1989, which has had a significant impact within the anarchist movement. The work argues that a “class and economic analysis for the reconstruction of society is not possible if racism as a social impediment is not fully considered, and the concerns of people of color are not included in a social revolutionary agenda.” Beyond his important written contributions, Ervin has also been active in prison rights work, the Black Autonomy / people of color tendency within contemporary anarchism, anti-racism movements, and other social change projects.

The Quilombo Project
Carlos Fernandez & Jena Cephas - $2,000.00
This project explores the experience and theories of people of color within anarchism. The first part of the project, in the form of interviews and reports, describes the actual presence of people of color in contemporary US anarchism. The second part, an overview of the theories used by anarchists of color in comparison with anarchist canons, seeks to reevaluate anarchist theory in the light of the comparison. Fernandez is a student, activist, and author published in Arsenal Magazine and Onward Magazine. Cephas is currently studying architecture as an undergraduate with a focus on gentrification and affordable housing and she has been engaged in grassroots activism for over ten years.

The Anarchist Within:
Anarchist Prisoners Building a Movement
Ronald Campbell - $1,000.00
This project examines contributions made by imprisoned anarchists to the anarchist community and covers the various organizations and projects founded by these prisoners, as well as their reception by fellow prisoners, prison administrators, and the anarchist community. While many prisoners have written for various anarchist publications, this project focuses on anarchist groups operating within prison. Ronald Campbell has been actively involved in anarchist support groups as well as, while serving time, anarchist groups within prison.

Pachamama Betrayed:
Ecological Crime and Indigenous Resistance to the Andean Drug Wars
Bill Weinberg - $1,000.00
This book deconstructs the Orwellian euphemism of the “War on Drugs” by revealing how US military involvement in Latin American has not changed since the era of “gunboat diplomacy.” By dissecting corporate interests in Columbia and examining indigenous resistance movements against US plans for the region, which violate international standards on war crimes and genocide, it makes a case for the revival of anti-war activism in the US and forge ties between the US and Andean activist communities. Weinberg is the author of War on the Land: Ecology and Politics in Central America (Zed, 1990) and Homage to Chiapas: The New Indigenous Struggles in Mexico (Verso, 2000).

Gender in Current Anti-Globalization Activism in Canada
Caitlin Hewitt-White - $2,000.00
Using Canadian examples, this project assesses the potential effectiveness of the current anti-globalization movement in resisting capitalist globalization and in reconstructing a society based on freedom, equality, cooperation, and justice. Hewitt-White uses first-hand information gathered from activists to discuss the challenges that face the anti-globalization movement in not only
resisting capitalism, but also in confronting oppression in all its forms and in all spaces. In the face of a rejuvenated movement, this project helps us to correct on-going problems such as sexism within the Left. Hewitt-White is a student at the University of Waterloo and is active in the Peak Collective and Guelph Action Network.

Racializing Anarchism Then and Now
Jessica Lawless - $1,500.00
This article and documentary focuses on the re-emergence of anarchism in the broader public sphere since the protest in Seattle and subsequent international anti-globalization protests. Addressing both anarchist and non-anarchist identified audiences, this study counters mainstream mediated portrayals of the anarchist protestors as ahistorical, violent, young, white males who are incapable of offering a viable critique of society. In particular, it argues that the mainstream media has agitated public anxieties toward young people who identify as anarchists by relying on racialized and racist constructions of "blackness" and urban uprising, taking the focus off the issues being raised and putting it instead on issues of law and order. Lawless has been active in many areas, including women's self defense, social work, and as an organizer of various anarchist collectives in Seattle.

Chile:
Anarchist Practices under Pinochet
Andrés Peréz & Felipe del Solar -
$2,000.00
As the title indicates, this piece focuses on anarchist practices and organization under Pinochet's military dictatorship from a political as well as cultural perspective. The study spans Pinochet's reign, beginning in 1973, to the present, by tracing the social manifestations, organizational relationships, and political contributions of anarchists. Andrés Pérez is an international free-lance journalist and writes for the national political magazine Ercilla. Felipe del Solar is studying history at the Universidad Cató lica de Chile, and has taught at Infocap, the university of the workers, in Santiago, Chile.

Three Russian-to-English Translations
Will Firth - $500.00
This translation project focuses on three Russian writings: "Russian Capitalism and Globalization" by the MPST (the local Moscow group of the KRAS-IWA) from a 1999 collection of essays entitled The Return of the Working Class, and two essays on Nestor Makhno (one by Russian anarchist Ida Melt; and another by N. Sukhogorskaya) originally published in Nestor Ivanovich Makhno (ed. VF Verstyuk, Dzvin Publishers, Kiev 1991). The first piece in an anarcho-syndicalist look at the economic and power structures in the USSR and contemporary Russia and examines how they fit into the world economy. It also looks at the existing labor movement in Russia and draws conclusions about the kind of autonomous, anti-capitalist workers' movement which would be needed to combat rampant neo-liberalism. The Makhno pieces are of a historical nature, incorporating recent research on Makhno and his wife.

Orange Fire
Kevin Doyle - $1,000.00
Orange Fire is a three-act theater play about the life, beliefs and struggles of Irish activist Captain Jack White (1879-1946), who strongly identified as an anarchist. White's life and anarchist beliefs have all but been obliterated due to the destruction of his memoirs and papers by his family (White came from a privileged Protestant family loyal to the British monarchy) and the fact that, as a revolutionary, he has been “written out” of the history books. In order to provide a framework with which activists can challenge sectarian divisions in Ireland, this play aims to situate White within Irish revolutionary history as well as anarchism and draws on the destruction of White's papers as a metaphor for the repressive mentality of a sectarian society. Kevin Doyle is an award winning short story writer and political activist. He is a founding member of the Workers Solidarity Movement, an anarchist organization in Ireland.

Anarchism and Revolutionary Syndicalism in South Africa, 1904-1921
Lucien van der Walt - $1,000.00
$1000 to Lucien van der Walt for "Anarchism and Revolutionary Syndicalism in South Africa, 1904-1921", which expands upon a project previously funded by the IAS. This new work will deal with the influence of anarchism and revolutionary syndicalism on broader social movements in the same period. The specific focus is on the impact of libertarian socialist ideas on trade unions and Black Nationalism. This project builds upon the original research into the influence of anarchism and revolutionary syndicalism on revolutionary groups in South Africa. Lucien van der Walt is a student, teacher and activist in South Africa. His work focuses on trade union activity in Africa and he has written extensively on historical and contemporary labor politics.

Toward a New Anarchist Theory of Nationalism
Mike Staudenmaier - $1,500.00
This piece develops an in-depth historical analysis on anarchist theories of nationalism and the diversity of opinions within anarchism. It focuses on a contradiction between theory rooted in class-based international criticism and a practice normally consisting of uncritical anti-imperialist and antiracist solidarity. Staudenmaier shows that this contradiction between theory and practice, along with very little written on contemporary nationalism from an anarchist perspective, only serves to polarize the issue of nationalism. Mike Staudenmaier has been an activist primarily in the Chicago area who has worked extensively with the Puerto Rican community.

Spanish translation of Murray Bookchin's Remaking Society (Rehaciendo la Sociedad)
Alberto Villarreal - $2,500.00
Originally published in 1990, this book is meant to be a summarization of social ecology, a political philosophy that bases the ecological crisis in the emergence of social hierarchy and domination and advocates for a radical transformation of society. A wide variety of Spanish speaking movements, particularly in Latin America, are struggling with social and ecological issues, which can be radicalized by ideas presented in Remaking Society. Villarreal has translated several of Bookchin's essays for Comunidad, newsletter for the Comunidad project of Sweden and Uruguay, and Tierra Amiga, magazine of REDES - Friends of the Earth Uruguay. He was a founding member of REDES and has been actively involved with social ecology for the last fifteen years.

The FACA and the Anarchist Movement in Argentina, 1930-1950
Fernando Gustavo López Trujillo - $2,200.00
This piece is a historical study of the Federación Anarquista Comunista Argentina (FACA). López examines the growth of the FACA from 1935 and into the 1940’s, a development that is exceptional given that the Argentine anarchist movement and its organizations were shrinking at this time (after being the largest anarchist movement in Latin America). López looks at the decline of the FACA in the 1940’s and 1950’s and the relationship of its decline to the rise of the Peronist movement. Lopez attempts to shine a light on the real reasons of the FACA’s demise, arguing that state repression cannot be counted as a primary cause.

Vanguards of the Crusaders:
Freedom and Domination in Right-wing Discourse
C.W. Brown - $800.00
This project studies the social and political theory of the patriot right in the US as seen through the lenses of classical anarchist theory. It has two objectives: first, to understand the patriot right discourse in the contemporary US in the context of anarchist studies in fascism, and second, to grasp the extent to which that patriot right discourse resonates with everyday American ideology and thus expresses the clean outlines of the ideology of domination in the ‘new world order’. Brown lives in Greenfield, Massachusetts.

Military Dictatorship and the State in Africa
Samuel Mbah & I.E. Igariwey - $2,000.00
This book utilizes an anarchist critique to analyze military dictatorship on the African continent. It is intended to follow up their previous book, African Anarchism: The History of a Movement (See Sharp Press, 1997). Mbah and Igariwe use libertarian analytical tools to lay bare the problems of military dictatorship. They demonstrate that military dictatorship is a logical, if perverse, extension of the state system (despite liberal and state socialist criticisms). They will also show that overthrowing military dictatorship does not remedy the instability, economic difficulties, and lack of freedom inherent in the state system and neo-colonial capitalism.

Anarchism and the Rise of Rightwing Anti-Statism
Joe Lowndes - $1,000.00
This work analyzes the emergence of anti-government politics on the American right, contrast this with the current failure of the anarchist left to construct and convey a viable anti-statist politics, and discuss the centrality of race to both. It will explore the historic connection between decentralism and racial domination in American political culture in order to advance an anarchist politics that can express an anti-statist populism delinked from discourses of racial domination. Lowndes lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Federica Montseny:
The Woman and the Ideal/La Mujer y El Ideal
Patricia Greene - $900.00
This book presents the first comprehensive English language study of the works and political legacy of Federica Montseny, an important Spanish anarchist and intellectual. Greene lives in East Lansing, Michigan.

Three Russian and Bulgarian into English Translations
Will Firth - $600.00
This project covers the translation of three articles on Eastern European anarchism from Russian and Bulgarian into English. The two Russian articles are: "A Survey of the Anarchist Movement in the Ukraine 1987-1994" and "Under Fire Between the Lines." The latter is about the Volunteer Medical Brigade formed by socialists and anarchists in 1993 during the conflicts over the seizure of the Russian parliament. T he Bulgarian translation is a compilation of various chapters from the book National Liberation and Libertarian Federalism by Georgi Khadzhieff. Firth lives in Berlin, Germany.

Anarchism and Revolutionary Syndicalism in South Africa, 1904 - 1921
Lucien van der Walt $500.00
This collection of historical essays articles the early Socialist movements in South Africa. While this period of South African history has received little scholarly attention, the dominant interpretations of this subject have been limited to the work of writers associated with the South African Communist Party, which portray it as being Marxist. Van der Walt shows that this understanding is not only incorrect, but also shows that the period was marked by a strong libertarian and revolutionary syndicalist character. Van der Walt lives in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Anarchism and the Zapatista Revolution
Chris Day - $2,000.00
This book develops a revolutionary, anti-authoritarian analysis of Zapatismo as expressed in the words and deeds of the Zapatista National Liberation Army (EZLN) and Zapatista communities in Chiapas, Mexico. It is composed of three main components: an empirical investigation of Zapatista theory and practice, a consideration of the two main forms of libertarian thinking in Mexico—the traditions of indigenous autonomy and European anarchism; and finally an investigation of the more recent historical roots of the EZLN in the Mexican New Left and the indigenous struggles of Chiapas in the past few decades. It draws out some of the important lessons that the Zapatista struggle has to offer contemporary anarchism.

The Myth of the Internet:
Private Isolation and Local Community
Matt Hern & Stu Chaulk - $1,200.00
This book uses a radically democratic, anarchist perspective to investigate and critique the social and cultural repercussions of the Internet. It argues that, while the Internet appears to be a medium for genuine communication and democracy, it is actually undermining the very arenas in which actual freedom and democracy can flourish. Hern and Chaulk live in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Autonomy, Culture, and Natural Resources in the Neo-liberal Age
Melissa Burch - $800.00
This piece presents a comparative critique of the domination of global capitalism and its devastating effects on the local culture in three regions: the Mexican State of Chiapas, the North Atlantic Autonomous Region of Nicaragua, and the state of Vermont. It brings to light the fundamental incompatibility of the neoliberal model with an authentic, local, and ecological culture.

Redesigning Life:
The Worldwide Challenge to Genetic Engineering
Zoe Erwin & Brian Tokar - $1,000.00
This anthology of essays brings a comprehensive and radical perspective to current debates on biotechnology. It emphasizes the urgent need for an activist response to biotechnology and that efforts against it must challenge larger structures of social domination. Tokar is the author of several books including Earth for Sale (South End Press, 1997) and is a faculty member of the Institute for Social Ecology. Erwin is an activist living in Philadelphia.

The Educational Ideas and Management Practices of 19th and 20th Century Anarchists in Labor-Owned Cooperatives
Frank Adams - $500.00
This essay explores the practical educational efforts made by anarchists to end the exploitation of their labor by capital. It examines their accomplishments and failures in order to enhance our ability to organize work wisely, effectively, and in accord with anarchist values.

Freedom - My Dream:
The Autobiography of Enrico Arrigoni
Peter Lamborn Wilson - $250.00
Enrico Arrigoni (a.k.a. Frank Brand) was an anarchist author and activist of Italian descent who lived in New York from 1924 until his death in 1986. His remarkable life included a stay in Russia during the early years of the revolution, participation in the Spanish Civil War, and a lifelong commitment to anarchism. Wilson’s introduction analyzes and introduces elements of Arrigoni’s life and work.

Passionate and Dangerous:
Conversations with Midwestern Antiauthoritarians and Anarchists
Mark Bonhert & Richard Curtis - $250.00
Through interviews and their own essays, Bonhert and Curtis provide and oral history and analysis of contemporary anarchist efforts to rebuild community in areas of the Midwest devastated by capital flight, urban neglect, and the repression of marginalized people.

The Spanish Anarchists
Murray Bookchin $1,000.00
Originally intended as a second volume to the book of the same title, this project has been combined with the third volume of the Third Revolution: Popular Movements in the Revolutionary Era. This research chronicles the Spanish anarchist movement from 1868 to 1936, by exploring the period from the outbreak of social revolution in 1936 to Franco’s victory in 1939. It concludes with a discussion of lessons to be drawn from the entire Spanish experience.

Anarchist Modernism:
Art, Politics, and the First American Avant-Garde
Alan Antliff - $1,000.00
This book clarifies the pivotal role played by anarchism in the development of modern art in America. It explores both turn-of-the-century debates about the relationship between art and politics and the development of discourses that cast anarchism in the arts as part of a larger revolutionary culture. It demonstrates that anarchist artists and art critics formulated their artistic practices and criticism to further radical programs of social transformation.

Avoiding New Forms of Repression:
An African-American Reply
Kwaku Kushindana - $500.00
This piece examines the rise of conservative tendencies within African-American politics. It begins with an analysis of the black liberation struggle of the 1960’s, which sets the context for a critique of contemporary black leaders and a concluding discussion of the black tradition of anarchy.

Civic Space and the Anarchist Dream
Paul Fleckenstein - $500.00
This essay uses Burlington, Vermont, as a case study for a critique of contemporary municipal development policy and practice. It explores the market’s transformation of images of civic space, the structural dependence of the municipality on the international market and the nation-state, and the implications of these developments for an ecological, anarchist politics.

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