The IAS Blog

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Uri Gordon on Anarchists Against the Wall

Anarchists Against the Wall is an Israeli action group supporting the Palestinian struggle in the West Bank. Join Uri Gordon for a presentation on the achievements and limitations of this joint effort, and for anarchist perspectives on Palestinian national liberation. Gordon is the author of Anarchy Alive! Anti-authoritarian Politics from Practice to Theory.

Filmed by Buddhagem at Bluestocking Books in New York City on Tuesday September 22, 2009

Donate to AAtW

Between Infoshops and Insurrection U.S. Anarchism, Movement Building, and the Racial Order By Joel Olson

This is a slightly revised version of a chapter from the new book Contemporary Anarchist Studies, edited by Randall Amster, Luis Fernandez, etc. (Routledge 2009). Joel Olson teaches political theory at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff and has been around anarchist circles in the United States for many years.

Anarchism has always had a hard time dealing with race. In its classical era from the time of Proudhon in the 1840s to Goldman in the 1930s, it sought to inspire the working class to rise up against the church, the state, and capitalism. This focus on “god, government, and gold” was revolutionary, but it didn’t quite know how to confront the racial order in the United States. Most U.S. anarchist organizations and activists opposed racism in principle, but they tended to assume that it was a byproduct of class exploitation. That is, they thought that racism was a tool the bosses used to divide the working class, a tool that would disappear once capitalism was abolished. They appealed for racial unity against the bosses but they never analyzed white supremacy as a relatively autonomous form of power in its own right.

Spoonboy Tour Journal Part 1: Ireland, England

The following is the first segment of my tour journal from a trip I'm on playing acoustic music in Europe. It's less analytical than most of the content we post here, but since I moderate this site I was urged to share it. It's meant to be taken as an anecdotal reflection on my trip, and the anarchist and punk scenes in Europe. Enjoy!

-David Combs a.k.a. Spoonboy

Revolutionizing Hope: Strategies and Visions from an Anarchist Perspective

IAS panel at EcoNvergence Conference in Portland, OR
Saturday, October 3 at 9:15 a.m.
with Harjit Singh Gill, Paul Messersmith-Glavin, Andrej Grubacic, and Cindy Milstein

Private versus 'Socialised' healthcare

Originally posted on Anarchist Federation.

The noisy, controversial and increasingly confrontational ‘debate’ in the USA over the Obama administration’s proposed healthcare reforms has received a good deal of attention in the UK, especially after a series of speeches, articles, email circulars and TV ads began making outlandish claims about both the contents of the proposals and the UK NHS, which is supposedly about to be emulated in the US.

Private versus 'Socialised' healthcare

Originally posted on Anarchist Federation.

The noisy, controversial and increasingly confrontational ‘debate’ in the USA over the Obama administration’s proposed healthcare reforms has received a good deal of attention in the UK, especially after a series of speeches, articles, email circulars and TV ads began making outlandish claims about both the contents of the proposals and the UK NHS, which is supposedly about to be emulated in the US.

Fragments of an Anarchist Public Health: Developing Visions of a Healthy Society by Marcus Hill

Originally posted on the Reimagining Society Project.

Taking note of intensifying anarchist social movements worldwide, the goal of this paper is to provide some vision through relating the objectives of these movements to discourse going on within the area of public health—specifically, taking into account these movements' social, political, and economic goals, impact, and implications toward considering what functionally makes for a healthy society. The intention of this paper is both to work toward developing a proposal for considering the merits of radical and utopian ways of thinking and practice within the domains of health care and public health policy, and discuss a developing awareness that such currents of thought are (re)emerging worldwide and have been reconsidering and challenging hierarchical institutions and industry across the board. Development is needed in terms of envisioning functional health care and (more broadly) a healthy society by discussing where things can go from here.

Of Tea-Parties and Patriots: Liberty for Who? by Dave Strano

The following article was written and directed towards members of the "Liberty Movement," participants in the Tea Parties and Town Hall meeting protests. It was originally intended to be handed out at Colorado gun shows, where anarchists have done counter-recruitment against the Minutemen:

Of Tea-Parties and Patriots:
Liberty for who?

As town hall meetings on health care become the targets for disruptive protest and a growing “pro-liberty” movement gains traction and headlines, a full analysis of the situations we are facing as white working class people and an analysis of the strategies of the new “pro-liberty” movement is necessary.

I am authoring this piece as a white working class male that comes from a military family background, and identifies to some extent as being a libertarian. This description of myself is important as it helps color the perspective I am writing from, as any differences in my background, race, or socio-economic status would ultimately change the entire nature of this essay.

This piece is also mainly directed at white working class people that are active within this new movement. The reasons for this are many, as will become obvious as this piece progresses.

Building a Non-Eurocentric Anarchism in Our Communities: Dialogue with Ashanti Alston

Originally published on Anarkismo.net

The following is an interview with Ashanti Alston Omowali, an African descent anarchist activist, who started his political militancy back in the ‘60s in the Black Panther Party. He was also a member of the Black Liberation Army, and because of his revolutionary activities spent more than a decade in prison. In prison he moved forward to anarchism and after his release he has participated with numerous libertarian initiatives and publications, and is one of the founders of Anarchist People of Color (APOC), a network that brings together anarchists of colour in the remarkably racist US. Ashanti also participates in a number of initiatives ranging from solidarity with political prisoners in the US to the Institute for Anarchist Studies.

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